The Eye of Napoléon

Fact #13 ( Ulysses S. Grant)

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant smoked at least 20 cigars a day and, after a brilliant war victory, a nation of well wishers sent him more than 10,000 cigars. He later died of throat cancer.

napolean-bonaparte_crossinalpsThe Frazier History Museum in Louisville, Kentucky is proud to present a new and magnificent exhibition The Eye of Napoleon. With over 200 works of Napoleon Bonaparte’s paintings, sculpture, jewels, books, furniture and vintage clothing, The Eye of Napoleon is living proof the infamous and ruthless Emperor of France was a complex man. With royal palaces to furnish, and lavish gifts to amass for multiple wives, lovers and family members, Napoleon’s great taste was a powerful asset personally and politically. The Eye of Napoleon, featuring the personal art collection of Napoleon Bonaparte, runs through March 2, 2014. It is both fitting and ironic that The Eye of Napoleon will be showcased in Louisville, the city named after King Louis XVI. It was his younger brother, King Louis XVIII, hardly a chip off the old block, who possessed enough ambition to begin unraveling Napoleon’s reign, both as a conqueror and a connoisseur.

The French Revolution sowed the seeds that brought Napoleon Bonaparte to power in March of 1804. In an effort to boost national morale, the Emperor made it clear early on that French artists were underrated and under his rule, they would receive the deserved glory granted to artists out of the classical civilizations of Rome and Athens. With that declaration, Napoleon pledged he would set an example as the nation’s art patron, par excellence. And the Emperor delivered.

Napoleon led the expansion of the world renowned Louvre Museum (briefly renamed Musee Napoleon) and donated hundreds pieces plundered during his brutal conquests in Italy.  But it was the French artists of the period whose masterpieces received preferential placement.  Napoleon’s favorite paintings and drawings were done by Gerard, Prud’hon, David and Percier et. Fontaine. His A-list of sculptors included Houdon, Canova and Chaudet.   All had a place in Napoleon’s private collection as well.

For students, there will be a guided program, Age of Revolutions, available November 4, 2013 through March 2, 2014. (Grades: 6 – 12, minimum 15 / maximum 80).  Age of Revolutions will examine popular rebellions in three different countries, using the Frazier’s permanent galleries as well as The Eye of Napoleon. Topics covered will include:  forms of government; transitions of power; impacts on culture and society; and important figures, events and documents related to the theme of revolution. Visitors to “The Eye of Napoleon,” produced by Exhibits Development Group and created from the private collection of First Empire authority and author, Pierre-Jean Chalençon, will see many fascinating and famous works of art and craft.

MUSEUM HOURS:
Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sundays, noon to 5 p.m.
In addition to the January 11 Date Night in Paris, the museum will remain open until 9 p.m. on the following Saturdays:  January 18, 25, and February 1st.

 

INDIVIDUAL TICKETS: Eye of Napoleon (includes admission to Frazier Galleries)
Adults………………………..$18.50
Military………………………$16.50
Seniors (60+)……………….$16.50
Students………………………$14.50
(14-17 & college w/I.D.)
Children……………………..$6.00
Member Adult………………$8.00
Teachers……………………..$10.00
Member Child……………….No Charge

We accept Visa, MasterCard & Discover, as well as cash, checks & traveler’s checks. 

Comments are closed.